My Fujifilm X100F Fujicolor Superia 800 Film Simulation Recipe (PRO Neg. Std)

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Caramel Macchiato – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

Back in the days when I shot a lot of film, I would typically use ISOs of 25, 50, 64, 100 and 160. I would consider ISO 400 film as my go-to high-ISO choice (yes, I considered ISO 400 to be high-ISO!), but sometimes that wasn’t enough. For black-and-white photography there were several good options (mostly involving push-process), yet for color the choices for good film with ISOs above 400 were few and far between. When I needed something faster than ISO 400 for color work, the two options that I typically went with were Fujicolor Pro 800Z and Fujicolor Superia 800.

Fujicolor Pro 800Z was a good indoor portrait film. It had muted colors, low contrast, a very slight yellow cast, accurate skin tones, and fine grain (for ISO 800 film). It was quite popular among wedding and event photographers. For low-light pictures of people it was the best option. I used it a few times.

Fujicolor Superia 800 was a better film choice for things other than portraits. Of the two films, it had more color saturation, more contrast, a green cast, less accurate skin tones and more grain. It was the more bold, gritty, punchy choice of the two. Not that it was particularly wild (because it wasn’t), but Pro 800Z, while it could be beautiful, was especially bland (which is why it was good for pictures of people). I used Superia 800 a lot more frequently than Pro 800Z.

With this in mind, I set out to create a facsimile to Superia 800 with my Fujifilm X100F. I wanted in-camera to create the look of the high-speed film. I experimented with different film simulations and settings, and was able to achieve something similar to the film, using PRO Neg. Std as the starting point. It’s not a 100% match, but I feel like it’s convincing enough that I might be able to fool someone into thinking that I used actual film instead of digital capture.

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Sketching By A Window – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

One issue that I have with this film simulation recipe is the film grain. Even with a strong grain effect selected, it’s not quite as grainy as Superia 800 (specifically, the faux grain is too small). In fact, it might not even be as grainy as Pro 800Z! If there was an extra-strength grain effect option I would choose that instead, but alas there is not. I think it is grainy enough to give the right impression, even if inaccurate.

Another thing that’s not quite right about my film simulation recipe is that skin tones are too accurate when compared to the film. Superia 800 did not render human skin as nicely as these settings do. Even though it’s not true to the film in this regard, it might be viewed as a positive and not a negative.

Otherwise, my Fujicolor Superia 800 Film Simulation recipe produces a convincing analog film look, delivering pleasing results in a variety of situations. I’ve been using it extensively since I created it a week ago. I’m very happy with how it renders photographs, so I anticipate it being one of my go-to film simulation options. I think it’s one of the best ones that I’ve discovered so far. I invite you to give it a try yourself!

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadows: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -2 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 (typically)

Example photos, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured using my Fujicolor Superia 800 Film Simulation recipe:

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Dormant Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Abandoned Bridge Over Weber River – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Weber Canyon Moonrise – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Watch Out For The T-Rex – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Lost Trail – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Baby Swing – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Neighborhood Stroll With Johanna – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Hanging Print – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Parked Alone – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Pigeon Window – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Disabled Illumination – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Illuminated Beauty – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Coffee Table – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Coffee Shop Latte – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Caramel Coffee – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Raspberry Cookies – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Cake Slice For Two – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Delicious Cake – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

See also:
My Fujifilm X100F PRO Neg. Hi Film Simulation Recipe
My Fujifilm X100F Vintage Kodachrome Film Simulation Recipe
My Fujifilm X100F Classic Chrome Film Simulation Recipe
My Fujifilm X100F Astia Film Simulation Recipe
My Fujifilm X100F Velvia Film Simulation Recipe

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26 comments

  1. Alexander Chernov · February 4

    Thank you so much! I am going to try your settings. I have been using x100f since June but I am still to find my go to settings. The problem is that I don’t know what I want :)))))

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · February 4

      Thanks for commenting, Alexander! I’ve found some different settings that I like, but this recipe has already become one of my favorites. I hope you enjoy it, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Alexander Chernov · February 6

        Hi Ritchie! I gave it a try. I am pleased with the results I had. Take a look at my last post 🙂 Thank you. A bit too greenish, but it’s ok.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · February 7

        Be sure to leave a link, Alexander!

        Like

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  3. davidvv · February 13

    I found your blog by absolute coincidence. You are delivering some amazing stuff!

    I have a question about the WB-shift. Is it possible to make it from the Q menu, and have it stored in different pressets, or do I have to go to the General menu and adjust it there every time?

    Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · February 13

      Thanks, David, for your comment! I appreciate your kind words! Unfortunately, there are no presets or shortcuts (that I know of) for white balance shift, and so you have to set it ahead of time and not forget to change it later.

      Like

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  11. Luís Costa · June 13

    I’ve been using this simulation a lot these last few days and I’m loving it, great tones straight out of the camera! Here’s some examples: https://life-unintended.tumblr.com/post/174852183085/lake-life-lake-como-13th-of-june-2018

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 13

      It really fits the mood of a rainy day. Nice shots, thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Luís Costa · June 16

        That’s what I thought too. Fortunately it has been sunny these last couple of days, so your Kodachrome simulation has been my default for that classic summer vibe! 🙂

        Like

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  14. Igor · October 8

    I am so happy that I found your website. I love your color recipes! However, I found your Superia preset to be a bit greenish, is that the case with original film as well?

    Liked by 1 person

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  16. Sharon · October 26

    Funny. I grew up with the same impression: 400 iso was the film for complete darkness, 800 was something zi knew existed, 1600 was something I read about once or twice. My dad loaded his Olympus pen EE3 almost exclusively with Gold 200. When I used 400 iso, he said “are you CRAZY? Do you plan to shoot pitch black scenes?..”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · October 26

      That’s really funny! It’s amazing how far digital camera technology has taken us, and how quickly we have forgotten the way things used to be. Thanks for sharing, Sharon!

      Like

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